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  • Overview
  • Martha's Eggnog
  • Nutmeg Is Vital
  • Eggnog Recipes
  • Eggnog-Flavored Desserts
  • How Fresh Are Your Eggs?

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Everything You Need to Know About

Eggnog

For eggnog enthusiasts, Christmas is a wonderful time of year. Holiday gatherings are the perfect excuse to whip up a batch of this favorite festive beverage. Traditionally made with eggs, sugar, and milk, eggnog recipes have evolved from a simple whisk-and-serve to a more complex brew that may be  flavored with coconut, chocolate, holiday spices, or peppermint. Almost all include a good splash of brandy or bourbon or another favorite brown spirit.  

Martha’s preferred recipe follows the classic method of mixing raw egg yolks with sugar until thick, then adding milk and cream and letting the mixture stand overnight in the refrigerator. The next day, beaten egg whites and whipped cream are folded in along with a healthy dose of liquors (bourbon, rum, and cognac). The result is a silky smooth drink with a lovely froth on top and a heady finish.

For those who prefer a cooked base, there are recipes that call for heating the egg yolks, sugar, and milk together to a thick custard (as done for a creme anglaise or an ice cream base); the custard is then chilled and mixed with more milk, cream, and alcohol. Either method is a real treat and one of the few beloved dairy-based cocktails that is equally pleasing without the booze for little ones and teetotalers.

A grating of nutmeg (grate your own for the freshest flavor) is a traditional garnish, but if you’ve gone for a flavored version, gild the top of your cups with a hint at the flavor within.

For eggnog enthusiasts, Christmas is a wonderful time of year. Holiday gatherings are the perfect excuse to whip up a batch of this favorite festive beverage. Traditionally made with eggs, sugar, and milk, eggnog recipes have evolved from a simple whisk-and-serve to a more complex brew that may be  flavored with coconut, chocolate, holiday spices, or peppermint. Almost all include a good splash of brandy or bourbon or another favorite brown spirit.  ...

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All About Eggnog

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recipe

"I was raised in a Jewish family in Los Angeles, so I didn't celebrate a white Christmas," Elizabeth Colling says. But there was always eggnog. "I just love that flavor." She worked the holiday drink into cheesecake bars, dense on the bottom, silken on top. She spikes them with brandy for a grown-up taste and dusts them with fresh nutmeg.