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  • Overview
  • What to Buy for Bruschetta
  • Cooking Method
  • Our Best Bruschetta Recipes
  • Vegetable Variations
  • Unexpected Variations
  • Dessert Variations

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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

Bruschetta

Bruschetta is, at its most elemental, a dish of astonishing simplicity, a traditional antipasto of toasted bread seasoned with oil and garlic. In Tuscany bruschetta is called fett’unta, or “oiled slice,” and is usually served without toppings, especially in late autumn, when it is made to celebrate (and taste!) the first oil of the season. The Tuscans are taking a cue from ancient Rome, where the dish is believed to originate. Thousands of years ago, olive growers would bring their harvests to the local oil press in Rome and would toast slices of bread over coals so they could taste their just-pressed oil.

The word “bruschetta” derives from “bruscare,” Roman dialect for “to char.” And if you want to say the word like an Italian, the “ch” in this instance makes a hard “k” sound. Phonetically speaking, the word should be pronounced “broo-sketta.” 

In modern times (and well beyond the borders of Italy), bruschetta is commonly known as an appetizer consisting of sliced bread that is grilled and topped with a mixture of chopped fresh tomatoes, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Fresh basil is often included in the tomato mixture for added flavor and perfume. There are innumerable variations on bruschetta throughout Italy and the world. Cured meats, fish and cheeses, eggplant tapenade and other vegetable spreads, and mixtures of herbs and fruits or vegetables can all be served on grilled or toasted bread and called “bruschetta.” Nearly ubiquitous on Italian restaurant menus, there are even prepared jars of the topping sold in the United States and labeled as bruschetta, bread not included.

Bruschetta is, at its most elemental, a dish of astonishing simplicity, a traditional antipasto of toasted bread seasoned with oil and garlic. In Tuscany bruschetta is called fett’unta, or “oiled slice,” and is usually served without toppings, especially in late autumn, when it is made to celebrate (and taste!) the first oil of the season. The Tuscans are taking a cue from ancient Rome, where the dish is believed to originate. Thousands of years ago, olive...

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All About Bruschetta

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recipe

This starter, named for a fishing port in northern Denmark, was created by Swedish restaurateur Tore Wretman in 1958. Its appeal remains fresh and modern. If there is an Ikea near you, swing by to pick up the precooked small Swedish shrimp available there; they are a real taste of Sweden.